Boost for Indonesian ‘ecosystem restoration’ forest


Indonesia’s forests  received a boost when the nation’s government announced plans to double the size of the country’s first forest for “ecosystem restoration”, according to a joint press release issued by the RSPB.

It says that Indonesian Forest Minister Zulkifli Hasan has announced that he will expand the 52,000 hectare concession held by Burung Indonesia, the RSPB (UK) and BirdLife International in central Sumatra to a total area of 98,000 hectares.

According to the RSPB, the restoration area now equals two-thirds the size of greater London and is greater than the size of Singapore.

The bird conservation group welcomed the news, adding that other applications for ‘forest restoration’ licences are being submitted to the nation’s forestry ministry.

In 2009, the ministry is reported to have received as many applications for forest restoration licences as it did for logging concessions.

Applications for forest restoration totalled a further two million hectares, and are now being assessed.

The 98,000 hectares where the minister announced he would grant “ecosystem restoration” is within Harapan Rainforest, one of the last remaining areas of dry lowland Sumatran forest and is one of the most threatened rainforests in the world.

It is home to a host of rare animal and plant species, including the critically endangered Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), of which fewer than 300 remain in the wild.

It supports an amazing 55 mammal species, including the globally-threatened Asian elephant (Elephas maximus sumatranus) and Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus), as well as the world’s rarest stork – the Storm’s stork (Ciconia stormi) – and a rich diversity of other wildlife.

An initial licence of 52,000 hectares was granted to the environmental consortium in 2008, allowing them to protect, nurture and restore the forest in a former logging concession.

Illegal logging has been significantly decreased and forest fires, which once released significant carbon dioxide emissions, have been all but stamped out. Not only is the forest an important carbon store, but the tree planting programme in Harapan Rainforest is capturing more carbon from the atmosphere.

Botanic experts from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in the UK have identified a plant growing in the forest, Emblemantha urnulata B. C. Stone, that is unique to the area and had only been recorded twice before.

Agus B. Utomo, the Executive Director of Burung Indonesia, said: “The Ministry of Forestry had the foresight to create a new form of forest management in 2004 with the ‘ecosystem restoration’ licence.

“We’re delighted that ecosystem restoration is now an integral part of forest management strategies in Indonesia. As a result, Burung Indonesia is already planning to expand our portfolio of ecosystem restoration concessions.”

Source : RSPB press release

Date: 18/06/2010

Twiglet: Indonesian newly weds must plant trees


An Indonesian district in West Java, Garut, has started a unique program to support reforestation.

Mongabay.com reports that any couple planning to get married must give 10 trees to local authorities for reforestation efforts before the marriage will be legally sanctioned.

But it’s not just married couples that must support reforestation. Couples filing for divorce must provide at least one tree, according to Wibowo, the district secretary.

The new rules are the result of budget difficulties within the Garut district government, after the central government launched a plan to plant a million trees across Indonesia.

Source: Mongabay.com

Date: 05/03/2009

UK charity gets funds to plant urban woodland


A multimillion-pound grant scheme to improve access to nature has targeted a project to plant urban woods to help people reconnect with nature, and avoid anti-social behaviour, Horticulture Week reports.

Access to Nature, managed by Natural England, aims to hand out £25 million of Big Lottery money to urban communities to start or improve nature projects.

One of the winners, conservation charity the Woodland Trust, aims to transform 10 of its urban woods in the North West.

Its grant of £213,000 will help launch a Woodland Communities project, said Woodland Trust woodland officer Tim Kirwin.

“The aim is to re-connect local people with their environment and reverse elements of antisocial behaviour,” he said of the target area around Warrington and Runcorn.

The zone straddled two boroughs containing some of the most deprived wards in England and within one mile of an estimated 155,000 people, Kirwin said.

“We want to increase local appreciation of woodland and tackle attitudes behind current antisocial activities and the dumping of rubbish.”

Events will include woodland-discovery sessions for schools, conservation work and efforts to help “make the sites an asset to the area rather than a blight”.

Mr Kirwin observed: “It will involve transforming areas that are often deserted and sometimes litter-strewn into bustling outdoor community facilities and give people the confidence to use woodland more fully.

“Many people in the area are just not connected with their natural environment, so we need to find ways to help make that happen, with schools playing a big part.”

Another project to receive the lottery funding was Wild About Plants, a project lead by charity Plantlife, which has received £327,000.

Dr Helen Phillips, chief executive of Natural England, said: “Modern life can mean losing regular contact with nature, and we must find a way of putting people back in touch.”

Source: Horticulture Week

Date: 13/01/2009

UK research centre to host European forestry climate hub


A UK research centre is set to become the European hub for an ambitious global research programme into the impacts of climate change on forests, the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH) has announced.

In a press release, the CEH said its Wytham Woods centre, near Oxford in south-east England, will base environment charity Earthwatch’s Europe Regional Climate Centre.

Earthwatch, an environmental charity, has announced the opening of its Europe Regional Climate Centre as part of the HSBC Climate Partnership.

The centre, funded by the Hong Kong-based bank HSBC’s Cimate Partnership, will undertake a five-year climate change and forestry research programme.

The scheme is a partnership between Earthwatch, CEH and two local partner groups: Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute (ECI) and its Wildlife and Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU).

The centre’s researchers will examine numerous aspects of forest ecology; from the flow of carbon within woodlands, to the response of small mammals and insects to changes in weather patterns.

Over the five years, the team is expected to complete 40,000 hours of fieldwork, which CEH says is equivalent to 21 years work for a single scientist.

The new centre is one of five throughout the world. The others are located in Brazil, India, China and North America.

Source: CEH press release

Date: 18/08/2008

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