Illegal logging continues to plague Madagascar’s rainforest parks


Despite government assurances that it would crack down on the rosewood trade, illegal logging continues in Madagascar’s rainforest parks, according to new information provided by sources on the ground and reported in Wildmadagascar.com.

The sources report logging in three parks: Mananara, Makira, and Masoala. All three are known for their high levels of biodiversity, including endangered lemurs.

Rosewood logs are being transported to Tamatave (Toamasina), Madagascar’s main port, despite a national moratorium on logging and export of precious hardwoods. Most rosewood ends up going to China, where it is in high demand for furniture.

The Malagasy sources report that local law enforcement—the new Brigade Mixte Forestière established to reduce logging—is impeded the Forest Ministry, which has failed to grant them the right to use search warrants on private property.

The sources also claim that rosewood confiscated by authorities is being stolen from official stockpiles.

Illegal logging exploded last year in the aftermath of a military coup that displaced the democratically-elected, but increasingly autocratic president, Marc Ravalomanana.

National parks, especially in the North-East of the country, were ransacked by loggers employed by timber barons who traditionally capitalize on political instability or natural disasters to replenish timber stocks and traffic ill-gotten wood.

Madagascar is now ruled by a “transition authority” that has so far shown little inclination to hold free and fair elections and has been be slow to address the logging crisis despite pressure from the international community.

Source: Wildmadagascar.com

Date:06/09/2010

China timber sector looks at tougher EU/US import rules


The China Timber and Wood Products Circulation Association (CTWPCA) is seeking to establish a body to help importers navigate new environmental regulations in the US and EU that restrict trade in illegally logged timber, reports the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO).

In a recent market report, ITTO said that Chinese importers fear failing to meet the new regulations that govern the sourcing of timber products.

The US’s Lacey Act and the EU’s FLEGT ruling put the burden of responsibility on importing companies, holding them to the environmental laws of producing countries.

Companies found to be sourcing illegally logged timber could be subject to fines or worse.

A company accused of using illicit rosewood from Madagascar, was the first company to be charged and investigated under the Lacey Act.

The legislation was amended in 2008 to include “anyone who imported, exported, transported, sold, received, acquired or purchased the wood products made from that illegal timber, who knew or should have known that the wood was illegal.” The firm’s case is pending.

According to ITTO, CTWPCA believes traders need “guidance and support” on the new international requirements.

The body would also set up a “responsible procurement system” for timber imports, seek to address corruption in the timber import and trade sector, and aim to help Chinese timber traders meet international standards.

China already has guidelines governing Chinese companies operating forest concessions overseas.

These compel companies to abide by local environmental laws and take measures to reduce pollution. However, some observers suggest that there is no indication that these mandatory rules are being enforced.

Source: Mongabay.com

Date: 02/09/2010

Trying to curb the appetite of tree-hungry chopsticks


For the humble chopstick, life is predictable, reports Alice-Azania Jarvis in the Independent newspaper.

Start off as a tree, one of the 25 million felled each year for the purpose. Spend a brief few weeks, newly-whittled, encased in paper. Then wind up on someone’s plate, where you are expertly used to shovel noodles, or rice, or meat into a mouth.

Then that’s it. It’s time to face the great landfill in the sky. Millions of chopsticks meet their end like this. In fact, billions – 45 billion a year in China alone, taking with them some 100 acres of birch, poplar and bamboo forest a day.

It is one reason why attempts are under way to turn the Chinese off their disposable cutlery and on to the longer-lasting kind.

In 2006, the Government introduced a 5% tax on all disposable wooden chopsticks following petitions from schoolchildren and citizens’ group.

Since then, efforts to curb the wooden sticks’ use have increased. A BYOC (Bring Your Own Chopsticks) movement has been actively petitioning for sustainable options for some time.

Described by the China Post as a collection of “young yuppies”, they carry around their own implements when dining out. Occasionally, claims the Post, restaurant owners take it upon themselves to reward the yuppies’ efforts with a complimentary bowl of soup.

Greenpeace launched a campaign with the slogan “say no to disposable chopsticks.” In 2008, activists dressed as orang-utans invaded corporate cafeterias – Microsoft, Intel and IBM among them – to discourage diners from going disposable.

Then, earlier this year, the Chinese Ministry of Commerce joined with five other government departments to warn that companies using disposables could soon face legal restrictions. They claimed to “aim at decreasing the use of the throwaway utensil”.

“Production, circulation and recycling of disposable chopsticks should be more strictly supervised,” they explained.

It’s a stark about-face for the Chinese government. Prior to the measure, they had actively encouraged disposables’ use. They were, reasoned authorities, more hygienic that their reusable cousins.

The debate over throwaway instruments, while raging in China, is by no means limited to chopsticks.

In the UK, disposable cutlery is thought to be used for an average of three minutes before being discarded.

Plastics – including convenience cutlery, crockery and cups – account for 7% of office waste. That’s before the countless millions of knives, forks and spoons churned out by fast food restaurants, cafes and supermarkets are taken into account.

Recent years have seen the rise of the Carry Your Own Cutlery (CYOC) movement, while websites such as recyclethis.co.uk offer readers advice on how to reuse their plastic implements.

Increasingly, retailers are under pressure to offer – if not reusable – then at least recyclable options.

Starbucks recently pledged to introduce renewable materials during its next round of store upgrades and has committed to using entirely recyclable cups by 2015. Pret-a-Manger, meanwhile, has pledged to go “landfill-free” by 2012.

Not everyone has been so quick to change. McDonald’s, while using recycled paper in much of its packaging, defends its choice of plastic cutlery on the grounds that washing up would waste energy.

How effective China’s measures will be remains to be seen. The BYOC has been slow in picking up active support, and the government’s waste warning, while a step in an environmentally-friendly direction, is more bark than bite.

Legislation is looming, though as yet there are few concrete incentives for diners to trade in their disposables. Wooden chopsticks cost restaurant owners a fraction of what the more durable alternatives do, since the cost of sterilisation is high.

What’s more, the alternative melamine-resin chopsticks have a notoriously high formaldehyde content, which is neither great news for the environment nor diners’ health.

Polls by news outlets have found broad support for reusable items. Some 84.2% of participants told a recent Sina.com poll that they would swap for more durable options.

Still, analysts point out that the authorities’ interest is divided: environmentally, cutting down on chopsticks makes sense; economically – in the short term at least – it doesn’t.

More than 300,000 people are employed by the wooden chopstick industry, across 300 factories. Exports of their wares bring in $200m a year.

In 2009, it was claimed that 300 restaurants in Beijing had ceased to provide disposable chopsticks. In a country of some 1.3 billion diners, there’s a long way left to go.

Source: Independent

Date: 31/08/2010

China outlines tree planting plans for 2009


China’s Vice Prime Minister Hui Liangyu has urged government departments and the public to focus on the environment, and continue to plant trees, the China Daily website reports.

In 2008, China’s forest cover increased by 4.77 million hectares, Mr Hui told a conference attended by the country’s central and local forestry administration heads.

In addition, output of the country’s forestry sector reached 1.33 trillion yuan ($194 billion), an increase of just over 6% from the previous 12 months.

Forestry import and export volume was also expected to surpass $70 billion in 2008.

During 2009, China plans to plant 5.48 million hectares of trees, of which volunteers will plant about 2.5 billion trees.

The State Forestry Administration head, Jia Zhibang, also said at the conference that authorities will add more forestry jobs and increase forestry farmers’ income.

China’s top legislative body, the National People’s Congress (NPC), passed a resolution in 1981 making it a duty of all citizens older than 11 to plant trees annually.

The tree-planting drive is part of a campaign to boost green coverage to 20% of the country by 2010.

Source: China Daily

Date: 12/01/2009

Certified Chinese forest ‘reaches one million hectares’


Forests owned by members of the Chinese chapter of WWF’s Global Forest & Trade Network (GFTN) that have been certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) has recently passed the one-million-hectare mark, the environmental group has announced.

Set up and managed by WWF, GFTN aims to eliminate illegal logging and improve the management of valuable and threatened forests.

By facilitating trade links between companies committed to achieving and supporting responsible forestry, the GFTN creates market conditions that help conserve the world’s forests while providing economic and social benefits for the businesses and people that depend on them.

WWF says this latest news marks a significant step for GFTN-China in its wide-scale promotion of FSC certification.

FSC is an independent, not-for-profit non-governmental organisation that provides standard setting, trademark assurance and accreditation services for companies and organizations interested in responsible forestry.

WWF is one of the main supporters of FSC globally and has been working on FSC certification for about eight years in China.

Mr Su Ming, deputy director of international co-operation for the State Forestry Administration said: “Sustainable management is a long-term goal for China’s forestry development [and] forest certification is one of the most effective methods to ensure this goal.

“We’re delighted by the co-operation between domestic forestry companies and international conservation organisations to introduce such advance management concepts and approaches to China.”

WWF says the goal of GFTN-China is to eliminate illegal logging and improve the management of valuable and threatened forests in China, and in those countries supplying wood and fibre to China.

Source: WWF press release

Date: 07/01/2009

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