Old elm ‘may help save other trees’

Experts hope an elm tree that survived the ravages of Dutch elm disease could hold the key to the species survival in the UK, the BBC News website reports.

The elm was discovered in a Worcestershire hedgerow, near Pershore, two years ago.

It had remained unnoticed because it was assumed all elms in the area had been wiped out by the disease.

The condition, which is carried by a bark beetle, has affected more than 20 million elm trees in the UK since 1970.

Now, Pershore College has taken cuttings from the newly discovered tree and has just planted the first of them.

Bob Hares, from the college, which specialises in horticulture, said that growing cuttings from old trees was difficult.

“The idea is usually to take cuttings from the young trees, which root much more readily, and build up from there,” he said.

The team will not know if these cuttings have the resistance of what they call the “mother tree” until they are about 10 to 15 years old, but they are hopeful.

Now the search is on for other elms that have survived and may also be resistant to Dutch elm disease.

The biggest problem for the college’s team is that most of us do not know what an elm looks like.

John Clarke works for Kemerton Conservation Trust, which works to preserve the natural landscape of Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire.

He said it would be mostly people older than 40 who would be able to recognise elms, “especially people who know trees like farmers and naturalists”.

Elms were once known as the “weed of Worcestershire”. The hope is there are more survivor trees out there to rebuild this much missed part of our landscape.

Anyone who sees a mature elmin the area is urged to contact the conservation trust.

Source: BBC News website

Date: 06/03/2009

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2 Responses

  1. There is anopther surviving elm tree alongsie the A429 between Barford and Wellesbourne in Warwickshire. It is about 100-150 yards on the opposite side to the entrance to the Horticulture Research International entrance.Could be worth a visit.

  2. Thanks Alan — we’ll pass the details on to the Kemerton Conservation Trust.

    Regards

    Take Cover

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